TRACING 1 DAY
Uncovering the risks of type 1 diabetes (T1D)
Meet Grant.
Grant is in his mid-20s and lives in a bustling city. He has underlying presymptomatic autoimmune T1D.
Discover the burdens and risks of T1D as Grant goes through his day.
People with autoimmune T1D may experience impacted sleep duration and quality.1,2

There are no data to suggest that TZIELD will have any effect on these outcomes.
In 2022, 62% of new autoimmune T1D cases globally occurred in people ≥20 years of age.3
It is estimated that about 180 health-related decisions per day are made by people with autoimmune T1D.4
Patients with autoimmune T1D use meal-planning tools like carbohydrate counting to stay mindful of the effect of carbohydrate-containing foods on their blood glucose.5
First-degree relatives of autoimmune T1D patients can have a ~15x greater risk of developing autoimmune T1D versus the general population.6
In autoimmune T1D, the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells occurs progressively beginning months to years before clinical symptoms appear. Those at risk may not even be aware.7,8
Autoantibody screening can identify at-risk patients before autoimmune T1D symptoms arise.9
 

INDICATION

TZIELD is a CD3-directed monoclonal antibody indicated to delay the onset of Stage 3 type 1 diabetes (T1D) in adults and pediatric patients aged 8 years and older with Stage 2 T1D.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

INDICATION

TZIELD is a CD3-directed monoclonal antibody indicated to delay the onset of Stage 3 type 1 diabetes (T1D) in adults and pediatric patients aged 8 years and older with Stage 2 T1D.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
  • Cytokine Release Syndrome (CRS): CRS occurred in TZIELD-treated patients during the treatment period and through 28 days after the last drug administration. Prior to TZIELD treatment, premedicate with antipyretics, antihistamines and/or antiemetics, and treat similarly if symptoms occur during treatment. If severe CRS develops, consider pausing dosing for 1 day to 2 days and administering the remaining doses to complete the full 14-day course on consecutive days; or discontinue treatment. Monitor liver enzymes during treatment. Discontinue TZIELD treatment in patients who develop elevated alanine aminotransferase or aspartate aminotransferase more than 5 times the upper limit of normal (ULN) or bilirubin more than 3 times ULN.
  • Serious Infections: Use of TZIELD is not recommended in patients with active serious infection or chronic infection other than localized skin infections. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of infection during and after TZIELD administration. If serious infection develops, treat appropriately, and discontinue TZIELD.
  • Lymphopenia: Lymphopenia occurred in most TZIELD-treated patients. For most patients, lymphocyte levels began to recover after the fifth day of treatment and returned to pretreatment values within two weeks after treatment completion and without dose interruption. Monitor white blood cell counts during the treatment period. If prolonged severe lymphopenia develops (<500 cells per mcL lasting 1 week or longer), discontinue TZIELD.
1. Reutrakul S, Thakkinstian A, Anothaisintawee T, et al. Sleep characteristics in type 1 diabetes and associations with glycemic control: systematic review and meta-analysis. Sleep Med. 2016;23:26-45.2. Estrada C, Danielson K, Drum M, et al. Insufficient sleep in young patients with diabetes and their families. Biol Res Nurs. 2012;14(1):48-54.3. Ogle GD, Wang F, Gregory GA, Maniam J. Type 1 diabetes estimates in children and adults. IDF Atlas Reports. Published 2022. Accessed December 15, 2023. https://diabetesatlas.org/atlas/t1d-index-2022/4. Tack CJ, Lancee GJ, Heeren B, et al. Glucose control, disease burden, and educational gaps in people with type 1 diabetes: exploratory study of an integrated mobile diabetes app. JMIR Diabetes. 2018;3(4):1-13.5. Tascini G, Berioli MG, Cerquiglini L, et al. Carbohydrate counting in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Nutrients. 2018;10(109):1-11.6. Couper JJ, Haller MJ, Greenbaum CJ, et al. ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines 2018: Stages of type 1 diabetes in children and adolescents. Pediatr Diabetes. 2018;19(suppl 27):20-27.7. Insel RA, Dunne JL, Atkinson MA, et al. Staging presymptomatic type 1 diabetes: a scientific statement of JDRF, the Endocrine Society, and the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care. 2015;38(10):1964-19748. Townson J, Gallagher D, Cowley L, et al. "Keeping it on your radar"—assessing the barriers and facilitators to a timely diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in childhood: a qualitative study from the early detection of type 1 diabetes in youth study. Endocrinol Diabetes Metab. 2017;1(1):e00008.9. Van Belle TL, Coppieters KT, Von Herrath MG. Type 1 diabetes: etiology, immunology, and therapeutic strategies. Physiol Rev. 2011;91:79-118.